Financial Library

Pay Yourself First for Financial Success

A fire breaks out in a movie theatre. You're there with your spouse and children, as are several local merchants. Who do you save first? The butcher? The banker? The hardware store owner? Their families? Or your family and yourself?

A ridiculous question. Of course you would save your family and yourself first. Then why don't we use the same principles with our money? All too often the butcher, the banker and the hardware store owner get paid first and little or nothing is left for us.

Law of Large Numbers

Over the next several years, governments in advanced countries will likely continue to struggle with mounting debt burdens and the associated rising costs of servicing that debt. It is also noteworthy to remember that total government debt continues to increase every year because of deficit spending.

So how does the Law of Large Numbers apply here? Simply put, at some point the whole debt situation could defy the ability of a government to control a national economy and the response to ever increasing debt burden costs. Here is a definition from Investopedia:

Maximize Your RRSP Return Through Asset Location

Do you know the real rate of return on your investments? Generally, Canadians measure the success of their investments based only on the rate of return. While it provides a good snapshot of whether an investment is doing well or not, it is not the only criterion for a true picture of success. A good portfolio is based not only on the return, but also by the tax implications of the investments.

Your Financial Dream Killer

Despite what many people think, the number one financial dream killer isn't portfolio losses, or financial emergencies, or unemployment, and not even natural disasters. The number one reason people fail to reach their financial goals is procrastination - putting off the inevitable until the cost of your dreams or goals become prohibitively expensive.

Buying and Selling the Business when an Owner Dies

Like many business owners, Rick and Warren thought it would be a simple process to continue the business when one of them died.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Rick and Warren had a printing company and were equal partners. Warren died suddenly. Warren's shares passed to his widow, Sarah, who became Rick's new partner. She expected a regular paycheque to continue, even though she knew nothing about the printing business and could not contribute to the daily operations of the company.

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